Google tracks you, even when you disagree

When the movie, Matrix debuted in 1999, one of the sexy technologies used as product placement were cell phones.

Nowadays, it is almost sacrilege not to have one. With the proliferation of mobile communications, a new way of surveillance made its way into the daily lives of users. However, many are not even aware.

An investigation on tracking by Quartz Media revealed that Google has been collecting data from Android devices since 2017. Often times, data collection occurs without the person’s consent; or at the very least, their knowledge.

In 2015, Google officially became Alphabet. After the mega tech company was bought, the organization was restructured into subsidiaries called units. The unit behind Android at Alphabet, accesses data about individuals’ locations and their movements even when they have turned off their location on their smartphones.

Researchers discovered that local cell towers ping Android users with their WiFi service turned on. Next, the location-sharing data is routed to Google, a company that has come under fire for its data sharing practices.

Big Brother Google

Tracking your movement and daily habits are a major component of apps by Google. The feature allows the company to monetize from data collected about consumers.

However, in Google’s privacy sharing policy, it states consumers must use their location services feature, in order for them to collect information. This issue continues to blur the issues of privacy, as other features for their apps.

With the dismantling of net neutrality, free and open internet runs the risk of being undermined. However, a company like Google will not be affected like smaller tech firms. On the other hand, it reduces competition.

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